Oktoberfest 


Oktoberfest is one of those things that everyone in Europe has to do at one point in their life. A very big tradition in Germany, but a very notorious event worldwide. Land of the Beer Mass’s, Brezel (pretzels), bratswurst (sausages), Hendl (half-chickens), and ginger flavored heart-shaped cookies.

TIP 1: So my mistake and my first tip before anything.. DO NOT TAKE THE CHEAP ROUTE OUT. BUY THE FREAKING TRADITIONAL OUTFITS. (it’ll cost more but is completely worth it)

Be mindful girls of where you tie your bow on your drindl. If it’s on the left side, you’re available; on the right side, you’re taken; in the front, you’re a virgin; in the back, you’re a widow.

This picture collage displays some of the traditional pieces of clothing, from jewelry, trousers, socks, aprons, dresses, scarfs to hair styles.

So I didn’t know any better and from things I had seen, I honestly thought I was good  getting regular Oktoberfest “costumes” (yeah by costumes think Halloween). Up until I got to Munich I thought it was fine… well I was wrong. I started seeing the older people on the train in their traditional outfits dirndls (for girls) and lederhösen (for boys) and then went to some stores with a local. It was then i realized my “party-city/ yandy-isque” outfit wasn’t right and quite frankly might be offensive to the locals. BUT  on the otherside of things, a traditional outfit for both guys and girls could realistically run you anywhere between 200€-500€. (so at this particular date and time I wasn’t with spending another 200€ on an outfit that I would wear once) So my first night at Oktoberfest I wore what I had.
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Did I feel awkward that first night? YES,  only for a second while I waited for my beer though.  The first night, I went at night, and I went with a local, which I think made it 1000x’s better. I did feel looks and glances of disapproval from girls, and men sexualizing me but I believe because I went with a local and we met with his friends I was more accepting. Plus by this time everyone was drunk (nobody was worried about me). But by day 2, my friend and I weren’t having it, after an older lady looked us up and down. I set my limit to $80, and lucky us (probably because it was the 2nd to last weekend of Oktoberfest) we found a store “Leder Fischer”with dirndls on sale. Wearing a more traditional outfit definitely made all the difference, I felt more comfortable and more accepted.

BOOM BACK IN THE GAME!

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TIP 2: Bring Cash… I’m actually not sure if it’s cash only, but I’m pretty sure it is.. or that it may just be cash in the bar halls. Beer mass’s are about 10.40€ (apparently thats due to the prices increasing), the regular drinks if you go to a place with an actual bar are about 15€, and food on the strip really vary. So make sure you take all of that into consideration and bring cash accordingly.

 

TIP 3: and this was a tip given to me.. be early so you can get a table. nowwwwwwww after have done it let me say you do NEED a table. They wont serve you if you’re not sitting/standing at a table. pero it’s not the hardest thing in the world to find people who will let you sit at theirs. Being a girl obviously helps a lot, but the people are generally really nice and drunk and aren’t too stush at letting you sit at the tail end of their table.

So make friends… lots of Friends. 

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TIP 4: Pre-Game, this goes for all things. The beers in the masses at Oktoberfest  are very strong and can hold up to 1liter of beer; 1-3 by themselves might have you feelings amazing depending on your tolerance. But at the same time they’re over 10€, meanwhile the beer at a local store will run you maybe 1€.

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TIP 5: Rookie advice, but EAT. Eat before, probably should eat during, and eat after. img_8235

also fun fact : All beer served at the Oktoberfest tents must be from one of Munich’s six breweries—Paulaner, Spaten, Hacker-Pschorr (the funnest tent there in my opinion), Augustiner (the best beer there in my opinion), Hofbräu and Löwenbräu. The beer must also follow the Reinheitsgebot. This “purity law” was enacted back in 1516 to control beer quality standards, and stipulates rules such as the recipe can only include barley, malt, yeast and hops. Brews contains up to 6 percent alcohol after being fermented and lagered for more than 30 days.

 

Oktoberfest waiters and waitresses can be seen carrying up to 10 mugs at a time! 

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